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Weeping Rock link

Print: Weeping Rock This trail is a half-mile round-trip which is the shortest trail in the park, but the broken pavement and moderately steep climb make it unsuitable for wheelchairs and strollers. To begin walk the footpath crossing over a drainage stream that is lined with cottonwood, ash and maple trees. The trail is well traveled due to its beauty, location and short length. At the top be prepared for slippery moss on the rocks and walkway as well as water dripping on the path. Steps culminate at a large eroded carved out area, something like a sponge soaking up water then releasing it slowly to feed the hanging gardens and dripping excess into the water hole below. When I met my hiking partner, Bo Beck, I told him I was going to hike every "trail" in Zion.  I had no clue what that actually meant until we began to explore.  With everything I have seen over the many years I still am partial to this little corner of the park that I visited so many times as a child

Weeping Rock at a Glance Weeping Rock
Photo Album: Weeping Rock Pictures
Maps: Trail Map - Backcountry Map - Overview Map
Day Hike: Yes
Distance: .5-miles
Average Hiking Time: 1-hour round-trip
Difficulty: Easy and short trail, but it is steep.
Permits: Not required.
Trail Conditions: This is a well-maintained trail, but incline and broken pavement in places makes it tough for strollers and wheelchairs. The steep incline of the path would also make it difficult to push a stroller or wheelchair. This is a cooler hike even in the hottest parts of the day. Water seeps down from above the Weeping Rock alcove onto metal steps and it does get slippery. Be prepared to get a little wet.
Trailhead: Begin at the Weeping Rock parking lot, then cross the stream on the footbridge. The trailhead breaks off to the left, opposite Hidden Canyon, East Rim and Observation Point Trailheads.
Trailend: Same as trailhead.
Trail Access: Usually from April 1st until October 30th Zion Canyon is accessed via the shuttle. Private cars are allowed in Zion Canyon the rest of the year. Park at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center to ride the shuttle and get off at the Weeping Rock shuttle stop. The rest of the year, when the shuttles are not operating, drive into the canyon and park at the Weeping Rock parking lot.
Off the Beaten Path: No, this is one of the two most traveled trails the park. Stay on the trail as tempting as it is to wander off the path and down into the pool of water beneath the trail. Straying from the trail damages the delicate desert environment and andstone is slippery so never walk or stand at the edge of a cliff.
Classic Zion Hike: Yes
Best Season: March to October is the best time to hike this path. This trail might be closed for short periods in winter during icy conditions and shady areas that get little or no sun. Ice sickles might also form in the alcove forcing its closure. In the summer expect a gentle wall of water to trickle from the rocks, but in the winter there is often a flood of water pouring from above.
Elevation gain: 98 feet
Restrooms: Vault toilet at the trailhead. print this page

Zion National Park Map Zion National Park Map Coral Pink Sand Dunes Map Zion National Park Lodging Cedar Breaks and Dixie National Forest Map Bryce Canyon and Red Canyon Map Grand Staircase-Escalante Map Where does the "weeping" come from?

Continuous water "weeps" out of the Weeping Rock alcove, keeping lush hanging gardens moist. The weeping is from above where Echo Canyon, one of the parks many slot canyons is located. Sections of Echo Canyon can be seen along the shared path of the Observation Point and East Rim Trails. There are other seepage areas resulting from the "spring line" between the two rock strata, kayenta and Navajo sandstone, but Weeping Rock is an impressive one. An impermeable shal, the Kayenta layer, makes up the floor of the slot canyon that prevents water from absorbing into the ground and forces it to find a place it can penetrate, such as at Weeping Rock. This is not a quick process. The water has been in the rocks for a very long time, about 1200 years in fact.

 

Directions to Zion National Park

From the North: Travel I-15 south, past Beaver. Exit on Hwy 20. Follow US-89 to Mount Carmel Junction. Take SR-9 to Zion's east entrance.
From Arizona: Travel US-89A through Fredonia, Arizona and Kanab Utah. Follow US-89 to Mount Carmel Junction. Take SR-9 to the east park entrance.
From the South: Travel I-15 north. Take exit 16 and travel through Hurricane to LaVerkin. Continue on SR-9 to the south entrance of the park. SR-9 through Zion National Park is always open and is also called the Zion-Mt. Carmel Highway.

Zion National Park Maps
 
Zion's Weeping Rock Trail

Zion Photo: The short Weeping Rock Trail is located in Zion Canyon. The shady path and sprinkling of water is undeniabley refreshing on a hot summer day in the park. At the end of the trail the view out from the alcove into Zion Canyon is truly magnificent.

 

Zion National Park Lodging

Lodging Zion National Park Lodging and services are available in East Zion. The main road through Zion, the Zion-Mt. Carmel Highway (SR-9) is open year-round, and is not a route the Zion Canyon Shuttle takes. Zion Canyon is deep inside the park. Towering 3000' walls form a slot canyon, forged by the violent rush of torrent water over millions of years. From late March to late October access through the six mile stretch of road is via the Zion Canyon Shuttle, the rest of the year the canyon is accessed in private vehicles.

 

View from Weeping Rock Zion's Golden Columbine
The view from the alcove is both unique and pleasing with Observation Point, Lady Mountain, Great White Throne and the Organ being its central focus. This is a great trail for families. A nice extra on this hike is the trailside exhibits, offering the names of flora found along the path such as the horsetails. There is a nice view of the Weeping Rock alcove from above that can be seen when hiking the Hidden Canyon or Observation Point trails.

Hanging Gardens and Columbines
The alcoPrint: Weeping Rock This trail is a half-mile round-trip which is the shortest trail in the park, but the broken pavement and moderately steep climb make it unsuitable for wheelchairs and strollers. To begin walk the footpath crossing over a drainage stream that is lined with cottonwood, ash and maple trees. The trail is well traveled due to its beauty, location and short length. At the top be prepared for slippery moss on the rocks and walkway as well as water dripping on the path. Steps culminate at a large eroded carved out area, something like a sponge soaking up water then releasing it slowly to feed the hanging gardens and dripping excess into the water hole below. When I met my hiking partner, Bo Beck, I told him I was going to hike every "trail" in Zion. I had no clue what that actually meant until we began to explore. With everything I have seen over the many years I still am partial to this little corner of the park that I visited so many times as a child. 
Weeping Rock at a Glance
Day Hike: Yes
Distance: .5 miles
Average Hiking Time: 1 hour-round-trip
Difficulty: Easy and short trail, but it is steep.
Permits: Not required.
Trail Conditions: This is a well-maintained trail, but incline and broken pavement in places makes it tough for strollers and wheelchairs. The steep incline of the path would also make it difficult to push a stroller or wheelchair. This is a cooler hike even in the hottest parts of the day. Water seeps down from above the Weeping Rock alcove onto metal steps and it does get slippery. Be prepared to get a little wet.
Trailhead: Begin at the Weeping Rock parking lot, then cross the stream on the footbridge. The trailhead breaks off to the left, opposite Hidden Canyon, East Rim and Observation Point Trailheads.
Trailend: Same as trailhead.
Trail Access: When the shuttles are running, which is usually mid-March to mid- November, park at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center and ride the Zion Canyon Shuttle. Get off at the Weeping Rock shuttle stop. The rest of the year, when the shuttles are not operating, drive into the canyon and park at the Weeping Rock parking lot.
Off the Beaten Path: No, this is one of the two most traveled trails the park. Stay on the trail as tempting as it is to wander off the path and down into the pool of water beneath the trail. Straying from the trail damages the delicate desert environment and andstone is slippery so never walk or stand at the edge of a cliff.
Classic Zion Hike: Yes
Best Season: March to October. This trail might be closed for short periods in winter during icy conditions and shady areas that get little or no sun. Ice sickles might also form in the alcove forcing its closure. In the summer expect a gentle wall of water to trickle from the rocks, but in the winter there is often a flood of water pouring from above.
Elevation gain: 98 feet
Restrooms: Vault toilet at the trailhead.
View from Weeping Rock
The view from the alcove is both unique and pleasing with Observation Point, Lady Mountain, Great White Throne and the Organ being its central focus. This is a great trail for families. A nice extra on this hike is the trailside exhibits, offering the names of flora found along the path such as the horsetails. There is a nice view of the Weeping Rock alcove from above that can be seen when hiking the Hidden Canyon or Observation Point trails.
Hanging Gardens and Columbines
The alcove at the end of the trail is fun and kids enjoy getting wet while adults delight in the lush hanging gardens. Weeping Rock is home to one of the most complex of hanging gardens. The hanging Columbine found under the alcove is endemic to Zion. Look near the steps where it is very wet and there is a nice selection of Columbines there on the ground. There are two species of Columbine in the park: the golden columbine, which is the one with the yellow flower and the western columbine which has red and yellow flowers.
Cable Mountain
What I like about this delightful trail begins in the parking lot where the Great White Throne towers above the area where the shuttle stops. The enormous Cable Mountain can also be seen from the trailhead. There is a interpretive sign telling the history of this mountain. The Cable Mountain Draw Works was used from 1901 until 1927 to carry timber and men from the top of Cable Mountain down to the Zion Canyon – Zion Lodge area. In the winter of 2011, a project by the park and the University of New Mexico School of Planning and Architecture to stabilize the historic structure was completed. ve at the end of the trail is fun and kids enjoy getting wet while adults delight in the lush hanging gardens. Weeping Rock is home to one of the most complex of hanging gardens. The hanging Columbine found under the alcove is endemic to Zion. Look near the steps where it is very wet and there is a nice selection of Columbines there on the ground. There are two species of Columbine in the park: the golden columbine, which is the one with the yellow flower and the western columbine which has red and yellow flowers.

Cable Mountain
What I like about this delightful trail begins in the parking lot where the Great White Throne towers above the area where the shuttle stops. The enormous Cable Mountain can also be seen from the trailhead. There is a interpretive sign telling the history of this mountain. The Cable Mountain Draw Works was used from 1901 until 1927 to carry timber and men from the top of Cable Mountain down to the Zion Canyon – Zion Lodge area.  In the winter of 2011, a project by the park and the University of New Mexico School of Planning and Architecture to stabilize the historic structure was completed. 

 

 

History of the Thunderbird

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East Zion Lodge

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Zion National Park Lodging

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Mileage from
Mt. Carmel Jct.

Zion National Park 12
Bryce Canyon 60
Grand Canyon 85
Cedar Breaks 45
Grand Staircase 9
Dixie Forest 22
Sand Dunes 11
Coyote Butte 57
Red Canyon 47
Tuweep 90

Stay in the heart of the parks, Mount Carmel Junction, and visit the treasures of the Southwest and Utah.

In these pages you will find insiders information on Zion National Park lodging & camping. This guide includes maps, pictures and even information on Zion's hidden treasures.

 

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Beta: Coordinates and other trail and canyoneering information by Zion Park search and rescue veteran team member Bo Beck and www.zionnational-park.com author Tanya Milligan.

To post trip reports, offer corrections, updates, or for more information please visit the Zion National Park Forum

Suggested Gear: A sturdy pair of shoes are recommend to hike the trails in Zion National Park. Many quality shoes will help grip the rocks and prevent injury. Experienced Zion hikers and canyoneers like the La Sportiva Exum Ridge. This shoe is great for hiking, bouldering and canyoneering.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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